On property tax reform results are all that matter to Texas voters

Pratt on Texas - copyright Pratt on Texas all rights reservedThere was an opinion piece at the Texas Tribune, they call it “analysis” in the Left-leaning publication that likes to pretend its independence, by Ross Ramsey titled: The Texas House is handcuffing property tax relief to education reforms.

The column is largely speculation from Ramsey but one part gets a key issue so right I will quote it here:

“People who are complaining about property taxes are doing so, whether they know it or not, because of school taxes. School taxes are rising with property values.”

Lawmakers want to talk to us about legislative process and the legal mechanics of how property tax reform must come about. All of those lectures on how such needs to happen may be fully correct but ultimately such explanations do not matter to voters. Voters simply want results.

You are not significantly reforming the property tax system… if you do not fit a similar system proposed for cities and counties to public school districts.

One could easily run out the clock on the 140-day legislative session explaining why limits on the growth of school property taxes must be taken care of in one set of bills and state code versus the other, and maybe running out the clock is what a few opponents of tax reform want, but what all the elected should understand is what Ramsey gets right: You are not significantly reforming the property tax system to prevent out-of-control annual tax increases stemming from rising values, or appraisal creep, if you do not fit a similar system proposed for cities and counties to public school districts.

Bemoaning others lack of understanding of the legislative or legal process is wasted time and breath.

Results are what matter.

Bemoaning others lack of understanding of the legislative or legal process is wasted time and breath. We don’t care; we simply want all the major property taxing entities covered by a system that allows us voters a say each year in increases in our property taxes.

 

See: Rule of 72 and why any election-trigger property tax cap above 3% is a failure and Poll: Overwhelming support of 2.5% trigger for local tax increase ratification elections; expect onslaught of negative claims to change opinion

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