What rational policy should come from irrational mass murders?

Pratt on Texas - copyright Pratt on Texas all rights reservedMay 18th of this year was the 90th anniversary of the Bath Township, Michigan school disaster.

According to the Detroit Free Press, “Andrew P. Kehoe, a local farmer and school board member,… had placed more than 1,000 pounds of dynamite in the school building over a period of months, setting a timer so it would explode when classes were in session… After the explosion, Kehoe drove up and detonated explosives in his truck, killing himself, the school superintendent, the postmaster and his father-in-law and a child nearby who had survived the original blast.”

Forty-five innocent people lost their lives and fifty-eight were injured. Thirty-eight of those killed were children and it would have been much more deadly had several other large explosives not failed to detonate.

The murderous Kehoe, the treasurer of the school, held personal grievances that in his warped mind made it okay to murder thirty-eight innocent children, children who didn’t have any responsibility for the things about which he was angry.

It was also way back in 1926 and demonstrates that mass murders, even at places such as schools and churches, even in idyllic rural communities, have long happened.

The act was meticulously planned, it was irrational, and it was evil. It was also way back in 1926 and demonstrates that mass murders, even at places such as schools and churches, even in idyllic rural communities, have long happened.

Who but the irrational think a solution is to make the innocent less able to defend themselves and effectively fight back?

Experience suggests to the rational that we should adopt policies which ensure more law abiding citizens are always and everywhere ready to provide an effective defense.

What do you think?...

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